Celebrating Ability – AAEGT 12th National Gifted and Talented Conference

AAEGT
Australian Association for the Education of the Gifted and Talented.

Celebrating Ability:
AAEGT 12th National Gifted and Talented Conference.

Presented by

The Tasmanian Association for the Gifted Inc.
Hobart
9-11 July 2008


1. About these Conference proceedings

The 12th biennial conference of the Australian Association for the education of the Gifted and Talented was held in Hobart at the Hotel Grand Chancellor from 9th to 11th July 2008. The 2008 AAEGT Conference was organised by the Tasmanian Association for the Gifted Inc. The theme of the conference was ;Celebrating Ability; reflecting the Association’s mission of advocacy of our brightest minds. The Association is representative of educators and parents concerned with students who are gifted. The conference was timely given the role that students with gifts and talent fit within the government’s education revolution agenda.

Responsibility for the content of each paper lies with its author(s). In some instances, presentations were edited to reduce size. The author(s) also retain copyright over the text, however material appears on the Conference proceedings website by permission of the authors. Any document may be downloaded for fair use under the Copyright Act and other relevant legislation. The content does not represent the position of AAEGT on any issues.

2. Organising Committee

Jane Cameron (President)
Lyn Lewer (Treasurer)
Kate Tucker (Vice President)
Kate Saliba
Philippa Lohry & Belnda Fenney-Walch (Secretary)
Lynne Maher
Phil Holmes (Conference Secretariate)

3. Presentations

Abstracts are available by clicking on the link in the “Title and Abstract” column Where available, presentation files or full papers may be downloaded by clicking on the PDF or Paper link in the Presentation column respectively.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

No. Author Affiliation Title and Abstract Presentation
  A      
1. Al Hmouz, Hanan University of Wollongong A comparison of gifted high, moderate, and low achievers in their attitudes toward the school motivation, self-regulation, motivational goals, and goal orientations
2. Anderson, Ruth. Southern Cross University, NSW Acceleration in the bush.
  B      
3. Bannister-Tyrrell, Michelle   Reading beyond
4. Bannister-Tyrrell, Michelle   Teaching the holocaust: Meeting the learning needs of gifted students.
5. Barnett, Kerry University of NSW Principal leadership and gifted education programs in NSW government secondary schools
6. Berry, Margaret Education Queensland. Leadership and Management Tips To Build Positive Outcomes for Gifted Primary School Students
7. Bousnakis, Maria Sydney Catholic Education Office Integrated underachievement model
8. Bull, Ian Melbourne High School Mathematics extension groups at Melbourne High School
9. Burns, Tracy Sydney Catholic Education Office Integrated underachievement model
10. Burton, Jennifer Comet Bay College WA Breaking through the glass ceiling
  C      
11. Cathcart, Rosemary Director Reach Education NZ Keynote-The conundrums of success ….
12. Cathcart, Rosemary Director Reach Education NZ Unconventional comprehension and other nifty strategies!  
13. Coates, Lisa Comet Bay College WA Breaking through the glass ceiling.
14. Cramer, Derrin Thinking Ahead, Perth WA. Are we talking about the same thing?
  D      
15. Dixon, R. University of Wollongong A comparison of gifted high, moderate, and low achievers in their attitudes toward the school motivation, self-regulation, motivational goals, and goal orientations
16. Donnan, Lindsay. Sydney Catholic Education Office Integrated underachievement mode.
  E      
17. Eddles-Hirsch, Katrina University of Wollongong A phenomenological study of advanced learners placed in educational settings suited to their academic needs
  F      
18. Fazackerley, Carl City of London Academy, UK. “Aim Higher” Workshop.  
19. Foot, Kylie   Teaching the holocaust: Meeting the learning needs of gifted students.
20. Forsyth, Claire Aberfoyle Park High School Enriching the English and Humanities Curriculum using IT.
21. Futcher, Helen Abbotsleigh Junior High School, Sydney Using pretests to cater for diversity in the primary classroom.
22. Futcher, Helen Abbotsleigh Junior High School, Sydney Designing web pages as an adaptive strategy to use with gifted and talented students.
  G      
23. Gagliano, Carla Abbotsleigh Junior School Sydney Learning to blog or blogging to learn.
24. Galitis, Ingrid Deakin University Teachers’ work and gifted education.
  H      
25. Harvey, Ross Kimberly Park SS, Qld. Leadership and management tips to build positive outcomes for gifted primary school students.
26. Henderson, Lesley Flinders University Proposed research looking at gifted students’ experience of a selective entry accelerated high school program.
27. Hickman, Rae Department of Education & Training, Warren Blackwood District Office, West Australia Philosophy for Children: Developing higher order thinking for gifted learners in the generic early years classroom.  
28. Hopper, Shelley Sydney Catholic Education Office Integrated underachievement model.
  I      
29. Ingham, Lindsay Aberfoyle Park High School Aberfoyle Park High School’s ignite field trips.
  J      
30. Jarvis, Jane University of Viginia Fostering creativity in the academic disciplines.
31. Jarvis, Jane University of Virginia. Celebrating diverse learners: Differentiating instruction in response to student readiness, interest and learning profile.
32. Jolly, Jennifer Louisiana State Uni. Understanding and designing rigorous learning experiences.
  K      
33. Kelly, Liz Melbourne Girls Grammar Student attitudes towards an extended curriculum program.
34. Kelly, Trish Warren Blackwood Education District, Western Australia Differentiating rural district delivery for gifted learners.
35. Kidd, Robin Calgary Board of Education, Alberta The river runs through us: A telecollaborative study.
36. Kronborg, Leonie Monash U. Student attitudes towards an extended curriculum program.
  L      
37. Lamoureux, Kevin University of Winnipeg Creative problem solving workshop.  
38. Langbein, Bev Kirwin State High School, Qld Our road to differentiation: A practical insight to sustainable school-wide change.
39. Long, Lye Chan University of NSW. Principal leadership and gifted education programs in NSW government secondary schools.
40. Lovell, Carol Aberfoyle Park High School Enriching the English and Humanities Curriculum using IT.
41. Lyons, Pam LaTrobe University, Bendigo Emotional sensitivities and intensities of gifted.
  M      
42. Milton, Steve Warren Blackwood Education District, Western Australia Differentiating rural district delivery for gifted learners.
43. Moffatt, Donna Abbotsleigh Junior School Sydney Learning to blog or blogging to learn
44. Merrotsy, Peter University of New England, NSW Acceleration in the bush.
45. Merrotsy, Peter University of New England, NSW Creative problem solving workshop.
46. Mudie, Diane Aberfoyle Park High School Aberfoyle Park High School’s ignite field trips.
  N      
  O      
47. Owen, Leanne Hale School, Western Australia Challenge Programme: Whole school integrated programme.
  P      
48. Paradis, Jill City of London Academy, UK. “Aim Higher” Workshop.
49. Parsons-Sims, Michelle Waipu Primary School, Waipu NZ Three small rural New Zealand schools, one BIG innovative idea!
50. Parsons-Sims, Michelle Waipu Primary School, Waipu NZ The gifted kids programme.
51. Plunkett, Margaret Monash University Student reflections on a ‘Likeminds’ experience.
52. Plunkett, Margaret Monash University Student attitudes towards an extended curriculum program.
  R      
53. Rodwell, Grant University of Tasmania Tasmanian vacations schools for gifted and talented students: Years 3-8.
54. Rogers, Karen University of St Thomas, Minnesota Principal leadership and gifted education programs in NSW government secondary schools.
55. Rogers, Karen University of St Thomas, Minnesota An ‘outsider’s’ perspective on gifted education in Australia.
56. Rogers, Karen University of St Thomas, Minnesota What’s happening in the world of gifted education.
57. Roundtree, Ali Department of Education & Training, Warren Blackwood District Office, West Australia Philosophy for Children: Developing higher order thinking for gifted learners in the generic early years classroom.
58. Russell, David University of Tasmainia. Celebrating ability: Industry-school- university partnerships
59. Ryan, Larraine Calgary Board of Education, Alberta The river runs through us: A telecollaborative study.
  S      
60. Scaife, Peter West Australian Dept. of Education Opportunity, access and choice: A Western Australian journey.
61. Smith, Fiona Consultant Psychologist, Sydney. Interpreting intelligence: Preliminary findings from the analysis of 800 Stanford Binet 5 assessments with mildly to exceptionally gifted individuals.
62. Smith, Jenny University of Canterbury, NZ Strategies for teaching gifted boys.
63. Stewart, Wendy St Ignatius College Adelaide Celebrating ability and disability: Developing talents in the GLD student with the assistance of ICT.
64. Stewart, Wendy St Ignatius College Adelaide Abilities only parents see: The DIY guide for parents of the gld/2e child.
  T      
65. Tapper, Louise University of Canterbury, NZ Gifted underachievement: Still an enigma?
66. Targett, Ruth Moriah College, Sydney Differentiation in the real world: How to check whether your staff are differentiating in the classroom.
67. Teirney, Roslyn Ogilvie High School, Tasmania “Aim Higher” Workshop.
68. Tierney, John Director to Government Relations Australia Advisory Making them listen: Lobbying for gifted education in Australia.
  U      
69. Urquhart, Felicity Monash Student attitudes towards an extended curriculum program.
  V      
70. Valpied, Jodie Melbourne University Was Einstein really autistic? Celebrated difference versus diagnosable disorder.
71. Vasilevska, Sue NSWAGTC Acceleration in the bush.
72. Vialle, Wilma University of Wollongong A comparison of gifted high, moderate, and low achievers in their attitudes toward the school motivation, self-regulation, motivational goals, and goal orientations.
73. Vialle, Wilma University of Wollongong From Gilmore to Emo: Gifted girls’ engagement with popular culture.
  W      
73 Walker, Jodie Abbortsleigh Junior High School, Sydney Using pretests to cater for diversity in the primary classroom.
75. Walker, Jodie Abbotsleigh Junior High School, Sydney Designing web pages as an adaptive strategy to use with gifted and talented students.
76 Watts, Graham Cognitive Education Consultant, London. Personalising learning for the gifted in a mixed-ability classroom.
77 White, Bronwyn Comet Bay College WA Breaking through the glass ceiling.
78 Wilton, Hazel Kirwin State High, Townsville Our road to differentiation: A practical insight to sustainable school-wide change.
79. Wood, Denise Charles Sturt University, NSW Acceleration in the bush.
80 Wormald, Catherine University of Wollongong An enigma: identification of gifted students with a learning disability.
  Y      
81 Yared, Robyn Robertson State School, Queensland Leadership and management tips to build positive outcomes for gifted primary school students.
82 Yared, Robyn Robertson State School, Queensland Gifted education morsels: A GEM of an idea.